Partnerships: Great Lakes Restorations Initiative (GLRI) Blog Series – Part 2, Rebecca Held

NOAA Ocean Science Blog sat down with Rebecca Held to learn more about NOAA’s GLERL and the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI).  This blog is one in a series designed to provide readers with different NCCOS partner perspectives as they relate to pollution research taking place in the Great Lakes.  

Headshot of Rebecca Held in front of a blue background.

Rebecca Held. Image credit: GLERL

Interviewee Biography: Rebecca Held is NOAA’s Great Lakes Restoration Initiative Program Coordinator, located at the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) in Ann Arbor, MI.  She helps administer and coordinate NOAA’s 19 GLRI projects, and serve as NOAA’s point of contact for EPA and other agencies involved with the GLRI.

How does your work relate to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI)?
The GLRI is the largest investment in the Great Lakes region in two decades, with multiple federal agencies working in coordination with states, tribes, municipalities, public interest organizations, businesses, academia and other interested stakeholders to focus projects in five primary areas:

  • Cleaning up toxics and Areas of Concern
  • Combating invasive species
  • Protecting watersheds from polluted runoff
  • Restoring wetlands and other habitats
  • Education, tracking progress and working with partners

What are some of the activities GLERL oversees for NOAA’s GLRI work?
NOAA’s diverse GLRI portfolio includes projects in NMFS, NOS, and OAR.  GLERL is the only OAR lab located in the Great Lakes region, and due to its central location within the Great Lakes, is a great place from which NOAA can execute much of its GLRI work.  Additionally, the Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program is co-located at GLERL and plans, implements and funds GLRI habitat restoration projects throughout the Great Lakes Region.

NOAA also has several GLRI projects taking place at other locations across the country, enabling us to take advantage of the agency’s wide-ranging expertise on science and service to support Great Lakes Restoration.

Great Lakes Restoration

Great Lakes Restoration. Image credit: GLERL

Can you briefly list the projects taking place across NOAA under GLRI?
NOAA has projects in each of the five GLRI Focus Areas:

Toxics 

Invasive Species

Nearshore and Nonpoint Source Pollution

Habitat

Accountability, Evaluation, Communication, Monitoring and Partnerships

What NOAA programs and partners collaborateand carry out GLRI projects?
Besides the numerous NOAA program offices involved in GLRI projects listed above, other partners that collaborate with NOAA’s GLRI projects include Great Lakes Sea Grant, universities, state and local governments, and NGOs such as The Nature Conservancy, Ducks Unlimited, and National Wildlife Federation.  Other federal partners involved in the GLRI include EPA, USFWS, USGS, BIA, DOT, ATSDR, APHIS, HUD, USPS, State Department, US Coast Guard, and the Army Corps of Engineers.

Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory

Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory. Image credit: GLERL

Where can readers find more information about these projects and the researchers carrying out the work (e.g., websites, products, data portals)?
Readers can go to the following sources to learn more about NOAA’s contribution to the GLRI:

NOAA’s GLRI Website
EPA GLRI Website
Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program
GLOS
GLANSIS

When and where will results of the GLRI  projects be available to the public?
GLRI projects can be tracked on EPA’s Great Lakes Accountability System (GLAS).  Additionally, the EPA GLRI website lists success stories.  NOAA will be working on compiling results and success stories of our projects this summer – check our GLRI website for upcoming updated info.

Where can readers go to get more information about GLERL?
The GLERL website is: http://www.glerl.noaa.gov/

 

This entry was posted in Areas of Concern, General, Great Lakes, Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Partnerships: Great Lakes Restorations Initiative (GLRI) Blog Series – Part 2, Rebecca Held

  1. Thank you to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – and its blogging team – for being part of the solution – and reporting information on the big part the NOAA plays in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI).
    In this case – specifically the interview with Rebecca Held – the NOAA GLRI Program Coordinator who administrates the 19 (NOAA) GLRI projects!
    I’m the volunteer media guy for a GLRI project across the Upper Peninsula of Michigan – along the shores of Lake Superior, Lake Michigan and Lake Huron.
    We have to work together – if we are to save the Great Lakes basin – the largest source of fresh water in America.

  2. Reblogged this on Interfaith Earth Healing Initiative: and commented:
    Kudos to the Ocean Science Bloggers for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – for the info on the huge part the NOAA plays in the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI).
    Read this interview with Rebecca Held – the NOAA GLRI Program Coordinator – administrating 19 (NOAA) GLRI projects!
    Yes 19!
    The NOAA projects are repairing coastal habitat – in the same spirit of the interfaith participants involved in the nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute GLRI projects across the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.

    Why are all the GLRI projects important?
    The answer is simple.
    The Great Lakes are the largest source of freshwater in America – and humans can not live without these healing waters – that we now must heal from our abuse.

  3. Pingback: Partnerships: Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI) Blog Series – Part 1, Julie Sims | EarthKeepers II: EPA Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, U.S. Forest Service, Nonprofit Cedar Tree Institute, Delta Green and 10 Faith Traditions

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