TECHNOLOGY AND DATA: NOAA and Partners Deliver New Climate and Health Data Tool to Public

By Juli Trtanj
National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science

This week, in conjunction with the release of the Obama Administration Open Data Policy, the interagency U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) launched a new online tool that promises to accelerate research relating to climate change and human health—the Metadata Access Tool for Climate and Health or “MATCH.”  MATCH is a publicly accessible, online tool for researchers that offers centralized access to metadata—standardized contextual information—about thousands of government-held datasets related to health, the environment, and climate-science.  

Led by NOAA’s National Ocean Service and with cutting edge technical capacity from NESDIS National Coastal Data Development Center and OAR Climate Program, MATCH is the culmination of a two-year collaborative effort by representatives of USGCRP’s Climate Change and Human Health Group from NOAA, NIH, CDC, EPA, and USGS.   For the first time, public health metadata are available together with climate and environmental metadata.

MATCH provides access to metadata for more than 9,000 datasets from NOAA, NASA, CDC, EPA, USGS, and USACE (US Army Corps of Engineers).  Many of the publicly available datasets accessible via metadata records on MATCH would be difficult or impossible to find and access through an ordinary search of Federal agency websites.  MATCH supports the Climate Adaptation Task Force and the National Climate Assessment.

Caucasian woman with long blond hair and glasses presenting to a group of meeting participants.

Juli Trtanj

NCCOS Blogger Biography: Formerly the director of the NOAA’s Oceans and Human Health Initiative, Juli Trtanj now oversees special projects related to oceans and human health at the NCCOS.

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